Taylor McGinnis is a cartographer and data analyst focused on policy change and community organizing.
 Above is a kernel density map demonstrating the locations of damaged buildings after the storm according to the   FEMA Damage Assessment  .

Hurricane Harvey Mapping Project

The Hurricane Harvey Mapping Project is an ongoing effort to assemble and map out data on the physical and social aspects of 2017’s Hurricane Harvey. The project aims to provide the public with interactive maps, visualizations, and resources on the devastating floods and associated infrastructure damage that occurred in Harris County, Texas.

The project incorporates several different approaches and tools to build a comprehensive profile of data collected and released by organizations since the event. So far the profile includes an interactive mapping tool that demonstrates building damage, population change, and plans for future housing developments; and a collection of raster data representing the physical attributes of Harris County before and after the flooding event.

 Above is a kernel density map demonstrating the locations of damaged buildings after the storm according to the   FEMA Damage Assessment  .

Above is a kernel density map demonstrating the locations of damaged buildings after the storm according to the FEMA Damage Assessment.


 Hurricane Harvey brought on historic floods that devastated much of the city’s infrastructure. Visit the   interactive map   associated with this project that depicts flood depths and damaged buildings from Hurricane Harvey, population change over the last seventeen years, and future proposals for real estate development in 2045. Through combining several layers into a single interactive map, viewers are able to observe a spatial depiction of some of the main concerns of Houstonians: that developers are not only selling houses on flood-prone land, but that accelerated development is worsening already intense flooding in the city.

Hurricane Harvey brought on historic floods that devastated much of the city’s infrastructure. Visit the interactive map associated with this project that depicts flood depths and damaged buildings from Hurricane Harvey, population change over the last seventeen years, and future proposals for real estate development in 2045. Through combining several layers into a single interactive map, viewers are able to observe a spatial depiction of some of the main concerns of Houstonians: that developers are not only selling houses on flood-prone land, but that accelerated development is worsening already intense flooding in the city.

  Damaged Buildings and FEMA Flood Zones . 68% of the damaged buildings in Hurricane Harvey were  outside  of the designated 1% annual flood zones. Read more about  flood zones  from the Shawnee County Flood Map Modernization    project   .   (A)  Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding   (AE)  The base floodplain where base flood elevations are provided   (AO)  River or stream flood hazard areas, and areas with a 1% or greater chance of shallow flooding each year, usually in the form of sheet flow, with an average depth ranging from 1 to 3 feet.   (VE)  Coastal areas with a 1% or greater chance of flooding and an additional hazard associated with storm waves.   (X)  Area of minimal flood hazard, usually depicted on FIRMs as above the 500‐year flood level.

Damaged Buildings and FEMA Flood Zones. 68% of the damaged buildings in Hurricane Harvey were outside of the designated 1% annual flood zones. Read more about flood zones from the Shawnee County Flood Map Modernization project.

(A) Areas with a 1% annual chance of flooding

(AE) The base floodplain where base flood elevations are provided

(AO) River or stream flood hazard areas, and areas with a 1% or greater chance of shallow flooding each year, usually in the form of sheet flow, with an average depth ranging from 1 to 3 feet.

(VE) Coastal areas with a 1% or greater chance of flooding and an additional hazard associated with storm waves.

(X) Area of minimal flood hazard, usually depicted on FIRMs as above the 500‐year flood level.

  Harris County Land Cover (2001-2011) . Land cover change and the loss of wetlands is determined to be one of the main reasons that Harvey’s effects were so severe. In 2001 54% of Harris County land was considered Developed. In 2011 61% of Harris County land was considered Developed.  For more information, or to access to some of the data used in this project you can visit the following links:  FEMA flood zone layer , the  USGS National Land Cover Database , and the FEMA Damage Assessment  damaged buildings  layer.

Harris County Land Cover (2001-2011). Land cover change and the loss of wetlands is determined to be one of the main reasons that Harvey’s effects were so severe. In 2001 54% of Harris County land was considered Developed. In 2011 61% of Harris County land was considered Developed.

For more information, or to access to some of the data used in this project you can visit the following links: FEMA flood zone layer, the USGS National Land Cover Database, and the FEMA Damage Assessment damaged buildings layer.