Taylor McGinnis is a cartographer and data analyst focused on policy change and community organizing.
 Factors that affect the wheelchair accessibility of cities can include slope, sidewalk conditions (curb cuts, pedestrian ramps, construction, barriers), public transportation with wheelchair access, heights of buildings and the existence of wheelchair elevators, wheelchair-friendly building design, and accessible affordable housing options. This project focuses primarily on the affordable housing locations in New York City that provide wheelchair access to residents, and their proximity (based on network analysis of pedestrian walkways) to bus and subway stations.

Housing, Transportation, and Wheelchair Accessibility in NYC

Created in February 2018

This project was completed for a GIS class at the Spatial Analysis and Visualization Initiative (SAVI) at Pratt Institute, predominantly through the use of ArcMap. In order to better understand the state of affordable and accessible housing in New York City for wheelchair users, I examined the locations of these housing facilities and their proximity to means of public transportation. Network Analysis was used to understand travel along pedestrian walkways between housing facilities and wheelchair-accessible subway and bus stations. This project aims to provide a visualization of access and is not intended as a formal guide for wheelchair use throughout the city. This project will continue to grow as more data becomes available on aspects such as sidewalk conditions and building amenities. Data was gathered from the NYC Metropolitan Transport Authority (MTA) and NYC Housing Search.

 Factors that affect the wheelchair accessibility of cities can include slope, sidewalk conditions (curb cuts, pedestrian ramps, construction, barriers), public transportation with wheelchair access, heights of buildings and the existence of wheelchair elevators, wheelchair-friendly building design, and accessible affordable housing options. This project focuses primarily on the affordable housing locations in New York City that provide wheelchair access to residents, and their proximity (based on network analysis of pedestrian walkways) to bus and subway stations.

Factors that affect the wheelchair accessibility of cities can include slope, sidewalk conditions (curb cuts, pedestrian ramps, construction, barriers), public transportation with wheelchair access, heights of buildings and the existence of wheelchair elevators, wheelchair-friendly building design, and accessible affordable housing options. This project focuses primarily on the affordable housing locations in New York City that provide wheelchair access to residents, and their proximity (based on network analysis of pedestrian walkways) to bus and subway stations.

 There are 115 wheelchair accessible subway stations (24% of all stations) in New York City, but because of old technology and system malfunctions, this number can oftentimes be lower. “Service Areas” represent the distance on roads and sidewalks that people will travel to get to a destination from an initial location. Here, they are determined to be a half mile from a housing facility to a subway station. These service areas do not take into account sidewalk conditions or other barriers to movement.

There are 115 wheelchair accessible subway stations (24% of all stations) in New York City, but because of old technology and system malfunctions, this number can oftentimes be lower. “Service Areas” represent the distance on roads and sidewalks that people will travel to get to a destination from an initial location. Here, they are determined to be a half mile from a housing facility to a subway station. These service areas do not take into account sidewalk conditions or other barriers to movement.

 Service Areas for subways are based on traveling a half mile from a housing location to a station in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Service Areas for subways are based on traveling a half mile from a housing location to a station in Manhattan and the Bronx.

 Service Areas for subways are based on traveling a half mile from a housing location to a station in Brooklyn and Queens.

Service Areas for subways are based on traveling a half mile from a housing location to a station in Brooklyn and Queens.

 The service areas, or the areas that wheelchair users travel to a nearby station, was assumed to be a quarter of a mile to reach bus stations. These service areas do not take into account sidewalk conditions or other barriers to movement.

The service areas, or the areas that wheelchair users travel to a nearby station, was assumed to be a quarter of a mile to reach bus stations. These service areas do not take into account sidewalk conditions or other barriers to movement.

 Service Areas for bus stations are based on traveling a quarter mile from a housing location to a station in Manhattan and the Bronx.

Service Areas for bus stations are based on traveling a quarter mile from a housing location to a station in Manhattan and the Bronx.

 Service Areas based on traveling a quarter mile from a housing location to a station in Brooklyn and Queens.

Service Areas based on traveling a quarter mile from a housing location to a station in Brooklyn and Queens.